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Mr. Boate


A new official was transferred to Dundalk from Waterford in 1827, to act as Comptroller of the port. He had the appropriate name of Mr. Boate, and the account of his expenses, incurred for his journey, shows that travel by coach was far from cheap. The party included his wife, children and retainers. The account, submitted for payment, is dated 20th February, 1827.

It reads :



  • Dinner bill at Royal Oak = £0.18.6;

  • Bill at Carlow for supper, beds and breakfast, including servants = £1.18.0;

  • Dinner at Naas, including waiter = £0.19.6;

  • Two inside seats in mail coach from Waterford to Dublin = £3.0.0;

  • Two outside seats = £1.10.0; Guards and Coachmen = £0.15.0;

  • Post horses from Waterford to Dublin, 76 miles @ 1s.4d = £5.1.4;

  • Turnpikes = £0.12.6;

  • Post boys, etc. = £1.1.0;

  • Expences in Dublin , same as Carlow allowed = £1.18.0;

  • Nine inside seats from Dublin to Dundalk coach = £7.13.0;

  • Four outside ditto = £1.16.0; Coachmen, etc. = £0.12.0;

  • Charge for 13 persons = £ 27.14.10; Deduct for 3 servants not allowed = £6.8.01/2;

  • Total = £21.6.91/2. 


Mr. Boate had scarcely arrived in Dundalk before he applied for leave. Enquiry as to why he should require leave so soon after his arrival showed that he had been taken into custody for the non-payment of his debts. The transfer costs not covering his servants, he had insufficient means to pay for them.




Source - The Port of Dundalk, by Allan B. Swan, Co Louth Arch. and Hist Journal XVII,2 .1970.


1 Comment · 5368 Reads · Print  -> Posted by POYNT on April 21 2009

Comments

#1 | rosie2121 on 25/04/2010 11:29:32
Good to read this. I had wondered how they managed to move their families across the country to a new station.
 

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