Coastguard Cutter

The Coastguard Cutter 2.21

-> Tony on July 08 2017
LX 44. Extract from Ardmore Memory and story (Internet)

According to an article on “The Rocket” by James Quain in the LX44.Extract from Ardmore Memory and Story (Internet)
Ardmore Journal of 1922.
With the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 the British coastguard Service ceased. “Tom Casement , sea-faring brother of Sir Roger, the executed patriot tried in vain to form a new Irish Coastguard. His efforts however did result in the setting up of the Coast Life Saving Service. About 50 coast life-saving stations were initially set up around the Irish coast. Ardmore Head was number 23; to the east lay number 22, Helvick Head, and to the west number 24, Youghal.”
In 1980 the name was changed from Coast Life-Saving Service to Coast and Cliff Rescue Service and Jimmy O’Mahoney was Area Officer.
There is also an article on The Irish Marine Emergency Service.
The unit is now known as the Irish Coastguard Ardmore Unit.


E107. The Dead Coastguard - Sir Edward Carson and provision for his dependents.

With reference to the suggestion made at Question Time in the House of Commons that he had laughed when the death of the Coastguard at Donaghadee was mentioned. Sir Edward Carson authorizes the following; The statement is absolutely untrue. I did interject a remonstrance at the suggestion that the death of this poor Coastguard was in any way due to any action of any of the Volunteers. I may add that this morning, at my request, a telegram was sent to our H.Q. at Belfast suggesting that some provision for the Coastguards family might be voted out of our funds, as he had died so suddenly from heart disease, as found at the inquest, and as his death had probably been accelerated by excitement caused by the incidents attendant upon the landing of the arms.
Reference; The Times 28th.April 1914.


LX170. Ballycotton seizure. 1819.

Waterford. September 14. A small cutter-rigged vessel, of about 30 tons burden, laden with smuggled tobacco in bales, and having also on board about a dozen ankers of gin, was made prize of on Friday evening off Bunmahon, having being abandoned by her crew, by the Passage Revenue barge. She was brought up to the quay on Saturday evening, and her cargo was taken out and lodged in the King’s Stores. Nothing is known with certainty as to where she belonged to, or whence she came; but it is conjectured that she is from the West of England and that her illicit cargo was taken in on the French coast. It is said that she has lately been in Cork harbour, whence she eluded the vigilance of the Revenue Officers, by representation of her being laden with herrings, a few barrels of which she had on deck, and immediately under the hatchway, to assist the deception.
Reference; Freemans Journal Thursday 16 September 1819.


LX204. Ship News. 1824.

Donaghadee. 29 November. On the 26th inst the smack ‘Vanguard’, John Williams, master, sailed from Port Patrick bound for the Isle of Man; sprung a leak on the passage and bore up for Dunaghadee; became water-logged and unmanageable, having 3 feet of water in the hold; went on shore in Portavogie Bay on Saturday morning, and on Sunday went to pieces. The Water Guards gave their wonted timely help. No lives were lost.
Reference; Freemans Journal Monday 6 December 1824.


K19 Discontinuance of Coast Guard stations. Report 1906-7.

We understand that a scheme is under construction for modifying the conditions under which the duties of the Coast Guard are performed. Pending the completion of this scheme, a considerable reduction has already been made in the number of Coast Guard stations on the Irish coast. The following stations and detachments have been discontinued :- Annagassan, Ballymacaw, Ballyshannon, Cahore, Derkmore, Dunany Point, Groomsport, Kilmore, Knockadoon, Knockalla, Larne, Millcove, Moville, Orlock Hill, Roberts Cove, Skerries; and in the following cases where land has been acquired for the purpose of building new stations, the Admiralty have decided not to proceed:- Cushendon, Dundrum, Malahide, Portrane, Renmore.



K49. The Affair of the‘Pomona Wrecked 28 April 1859.

Yet, for all the grim details that were revealed at the inquests, worse was to come when a team of divers, employed by the underwriters to salvage the ‘Pomona’s’ cargo, arrived from Liverpool, later in May and went down to the wreck. They discovered the lifeless bodies of numbers of passengers trapped in the hull. Among the first corpses which they sent to the surface were those of three young females, one of whom had six shillings in her pocket along with a passage ticket in the name of Mary O’Brien (18) from Co.Cork.
The divers callously allowed the three bodies to float away as they got on with their grisly task – a procedure condemned as ‘barbarous’ and cruel in the local ‘Wexford Independent’ of 14th.May. After that the police were notified. They obtained a boat and a supply of coffins and stood by at the wreck while the divers worked. There is one particularly gruesome story related to the coffining of victims of the wreck. The body of a very tall man which was washed ashore would not fit in to any of the coffins available. The folk-tale says that the mans head was chopped off with a spade and the trunk and head were then placed in a coffin.
Reference; “Tales of the Wexford Coast” by Richard Roche.



K72. Ship sinks.

A report came to town yesterday that on Saturday night, a barque, name unknown, ran ashore on the Long Rock, Ballywalter. A tar barrel was lighted on board the vessel, on which signal the Coast Guards got mortar and rocket apparatus ready, but before they could reach it she was washed completely over the rocks. She struck again at Morrison Point, near Ballyferras, and fell over on her broadside. Remaining in that position for some time, she was again washed over the rock, and was lost sight of in a squall of sleet and rain. She must have gone down in deep water.
Reference; Freeman’s Journal 4th.January 1866.



H149

An important contributor to rocket life-saving apparatus was William Schermuly who had been on the training ship ‘Warspite’ and at sea in windjammers. He became interested in the use of rockets for life-saving and developed an apparatus which won a gold medal at the Diamond Jubilee Exhibition in 1897. But it was not until 1922 that he made a real breakthrough by changing his method of launching. He now gave the rocket a running start instead of a standing start by firing it from a pistol. The rocket was placed in the pistol, a blank charge was fired which gave an initial thrust and ignited the fuse. This ensured a much lighter rocket but with a good initial speed to overcome cross winds and no delay in lighting the fuse. It was widely adopted by the Coastguards and although not as powerful as the Boxer Rocket, was easily carried about.
Reference; “Coastguard” An Official History of the HM Coastguard. By William Webb.



G77. Melancholy Shipwreck

. On Thursday night last, during a heavy gale from the N.E. accompanied with a heavy storm of sleet, a vessel belonging to Mr.Rickard, of Howth, unfortunately struck on part of the iron bound shore of Lambay, and we regret to add, that she soon went to pieces, and her entire crew namely, two Rogans, father and son, Murphy, Larkin, and Cashel, in all five persons, unfortunately perished, ere any assistance could be rendered, or, before the people on shore were aware of their dismal situation. There has been only one of the bodies recovered – one of the Rogans. When it was discovered, on Friday morning, it was found that the poor sufferer had reached a buoy, to the iron ring of which he had looped his arm with a piece of rope, but from the length of time he had to remain more than half immersed in the sea, life had entirely forsaken him before the party of the Water Guards, by whom he was found, reached where he lay.
Reference: Morning Register Tuesday April 1st.1828.



105E. Shipwreck.

On the morning of Saturday last the brig Sarah Maria, David Morris master, was discovered in Dowris Bay, on this coast, under jury masts. She sailed from Greenock for the Barbadoes the latter end of January. On the morning of the 4th.inst. while off Achill head, she encountered a gale of wind, and a heavy sea having struck her, she lost her fore and main masts, sails, and all on deck- even the binnicle, skylight, cook-house, chains, cables etc. etc. were carried off.
The crew were in the cabin at the time which saved their lives. The Coastguards at Dowris succeeded in getting her into a small creek in that bay. The cargo consists of bale goods, etc. porter, coal, potatoes, and a few casks of wine, part of which were thrown overboard, but the greater part is safe, and is taken in charge by the proper authorities until further orders.
(Report, Ballyshannon Herald)
Reference; The Evening Freeman Saturday 22nd.February 1840.



E224. 19th.June 1829. EX

A very extraordinary smuggling transaction has just occurred in Lough Swilly. A schooner arrived on Saturday the 6th.inst. at Rathmullan, with clearance from Liverpool,as laden with coals. She was boarded by the Coastguard stationed at that place, who left one of their people on board to proceed with the vessel up to Rathmelton, the Port of her destination. On her way up the river a person came on board and told the Coastguard man that the vessel was laden with tobacco, which must be immediately landed; that if he kept quiet he would receive £100, and there was no use in him doing any thing else, as he would be forced to submit. The man, however, attempted to resist, but was immediately seized and secured below; and in the course of a few hours the landing of the whole of the tobacco (supposed to be three or four hundred half-bales) was effected. The Coastguard man was then brought up and sent on shore with a present of 40 or 50s. to drink the Captains health. However on going ashore he immediately informed the party to which he belongs, who to the number of six men immediately proceeded to seize the vessel. In this however they were opposed and beaten off by the crew of the schooner, who subsequently abandoned the vessel and made their escape into the country. In the attack on the schooner one of the coastguard men was wounded with a cutlass in the arm, and one of the crew was stabbed in the breast. The mate of the schooner and one of her people have since been apprehended and lodged in Lifford jail. Of the tobacco, we learn that 96 half-bales have been seized near Strabane.
Reference; The Evening Mail, 19th.June 1829. (report Derry Journal)



E105. Shipwreck.

On the morning of Saturday last the brig Sarah Maria, David Morris master, was discovered in Dowris Bay, on this coast, under jury masts. She sailed from Greenock for the Barbadoes the latter end of January. On the morning of the 4th.inst. while off Achill head, she encountered a gale of wind, and a heavy sea having struck her, she lost her fore and main masts, sails, and all on deck- even the binnicle, skylight, cook-house, chains, cables etc. etc. were carried off.
The crew were in the cabin at the time which saved their lives. The Coastguards at Dowris succeeded in getting her into a small creek in that bay. The cargo consists of bale goods, etc. porter, coal, potatoes, and a few casks of wine, part of which were thrown overboard, but the greater part is safe, and is taken in charge by the proper authorities until further orders.
(Report, Ballyshannon Herald)
Reference; The Evening Freeman Saturday 22nd.February 1840.

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