John Vincent Rohu




M.29th.May. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. Boats still employed in Kertch.

Tu.30th May. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. The boats employed in Kertch.

W. 31 May. No entry. Next entry is ‘Thur. 31st. May’ and the one after that is ‘Sat. 2nd. June’ , so accuracy of day/date a little in question from this point. (Ed.)

Th. 31st May. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. The boats in Kertch. At 2 p.m. the two launches were ordered to get ready for an expedition in the Sea of Azoff.

F.1st June. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. Two launches left the ship and were towed by the Danube steamer up the Sea of Azoff. At 3 p.m. fell in with the Brander steamer and with the boats of the Princess Royal. At 6 fell in with the Ranger gunboat. At 9 anchored for the night.

Sat. 2nd. June. Daylight. Fresh breezes with heavy swell. Dismounted our guns. At 5 p.m. sighted the Miranda and gunboats, both French and English. That night we received orders to be ready for action. We were at that point some fifteen miles from Tagennock (properly Tagenrog). Ed.)

Sun 3rd.June. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. At 3 a.m all the boats were ready for action and all the fleet of gunboats under way but the water was not deep enough for all to go up so we proceeded at a slow pace as there are so many shallows about this place. Now and again, some of the boats were assembled on the starboard side of the Recruit to receive our orders from Captain Lyons and the other officers in command while the gigs were sent ashore with a flag of truce. At 8 a.m. the offficers were ordered to advance with the boats by seniority. Each boat was to tow the boat astern of it and to advance in true line. The French formed one and the English another and a floating stage and another belonging to the Curlew with a large gun in her and the stage with a long thirty-two mount and a beautiful blue ensign flying. At 9.30 the boats took up their stations and opened fire with shot, shell and rocket from the boats as well as the gunboats but the chief of our fire was directed against the government stone house and likewise to cover our landing party, for setting fire to the stores of rafts and timber which were discovered already, but we saw a great body of troops. They did not show themselves after we had opened fire so the boats continued to fire for hours. The boat I was on was ordered to go up near the River Don, but not before the enemy had opened fire on us with musketry. They did not do any damage, only wounding one man in the face. At 1.30 our launch and the three others were taken in tow by the Brander steamer and we were towed up by the mouth of the Don. There we set on fire several sailing vessels loaded with meat and meal. One was towed down with us. At 11 passed Tagenrog and saw the town burning very fiercely. At midnight got down to the anchorage.

M.4th.June. Daylight. Light breeze and hazy. All the fleet under way to Mariupol

At 4 p.m. anchored at Mariupol. The enemy appeared to be in great confusion on shore. They were taking away their goods as fast as they could but towards evening a great body of troops showed themselves but at a distance from us.

Th. 5th June. Daylight. Breezes and fine. At 8 sent in a flag of truce and assembled all the boats for action. Captain Lyons went through the fleet of boats and gave orders to advance. Just at the time our boats were going to fire another flag of truce was sent down by the enemy and as soon as it was answered and time given for the people to get clear of the boats we opened fire. Three rounds were fired. Then the marines were landed. They were sent through the town and destroyed all government stores and buildings. After all was destroyed, they were to march down again but the seamen and marines that were setting fire to the stores wanted to drop their work and go after pigs, geese and fowls, slitting the pigs down with the sword. At noon the fleet left for….. and different steamers took them in tow.

W.6th.June. Daylight. Fresh breezes and haze. At 9 a.m. the boats were assembled for action. They were towed in by the Recruit and a flag of truce was sent ashore, but the Governor pledged his word that we should not get any opposition. We could not do what was planned so the firing party was landed and there were . and two gigs sent down for the French and English officers. The burning party went to work and set on fire stacks of corn and hay that reached a mile and a quarter in length, returned to their boats and to their respective ships. At 11 a.m. left for … in tow of the Miranda with fresh breezes and hazy weather.

Th.7th.June. Daylight. Strong breezes with heavy sea. The boats were continually breaking adrift from the ships that were towing them. At noon our boat broke adrift but we did not need to be picked up because we made sail in our boat and sailed after the ships as it was far safer. At 3 p.m. got in under Miranda’s stern and made fast for the night. We could see a great number of enemy troops on shore and a great many fires. We received orders for all ands to come out of the boats except four hands. I preferred ( to stay ? Ed.) before going on board for all that there was a heavy sea running. During the night we expected to part our mooring and if so, we must have drifted right into the enemy, but thanks be to the Lord, it was not the case.

F.8th.June. Daylight. Strong gales with heavy sea. Large bodies of troops were seen coming down to the town. We were visited by that good Captain Lyon very early in the morning. He spoke to us and asked us how we had got on during the night. I must say he was a kindhearted man to us and he and his crew came and had a look at us very often during the day.

Sat. 9th. June. Daylight. Strong breezes with heavy seas. Visited by Captain Lyon early in the morning. A great number of troops showed themselves during the day.

Sun.10th.June. Daylight. Moderate breezes. The Banshee in sight with orders for all boats to return to their respective ships. We were towed by the Danube. At 2 p.m. while in tow and moving out through the entrance of the Sea of Azoff, one man belonging to the Princess Royal fell overboard out of the boat and was drowned. At 4 p.m. got on board our ships and found them ready to go to Anapa the following morning.

M.11th.June. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. A marine died and was buried. At 4 p.m. sent up topgallant mast and bent small sail.

Tues.12th. June. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. The Miranda arrived from the Sea of Azoff. Nothing particular during the day.

W.13th. June. Daylight. Fine weather. Got in all boats and made ready for sea.

Th. 14th.June. Daylight. Weather fine. Got underway for Anapa. At 10 a.m. anchored off Anapa. Admiral and officers went aground and found the place had been deserted by the enemy, the guns destroyed and now garrisoned by Circassians and Turks. The Tribune ran ashore but received no damage. The Admiral and officers returned. Weighed anchor and steered for Sebastopol.

Fri.15th.June. Daylight. Weather fine. At 9 a.m. St.Jean d’Arc ran aground toward the lighthouse but French and English steamers got her off undamaged.

Sat.10th.June. Daylight. Weather fine. Several of our steam frigates and the three launches of the Royal Albert got ready to go in under the fort. This evening at 9 p.m. our boats left the ship and were towed in under the fort by the Danube. At 10.30 the frigates opened fire with shell and each one, as it came in, fired three rounds, then retired to its anchorage. At 11 the boats opened fire with 24-pound rockets, directing all their fire at Constantine, meanwhile the shipping was firing at Fort Alexander. The enemy did not forget us !

Sun 17th. June. Daylight. Light breezes and hazy. At 3.30 met the Snake going to give the enemy a shell or two. At 4 boats arrived at the ship and a most terrible bombardment comenced. The roaring of the cannon was terrific and continued for the whole day. At 6 p.m. boats got ready to go in under the fort again, also the French and the English frigates. At 11 the boats were towed in by the Spitfire and we commenced our fire at 11.30 at Fort Alexander. The shipping sent in their fire in the same direction.

M.18th.June. The town was set on fire in three places and Captain Lyons of the Miranda was wounded in the leg. The Princess Royal was struck with a shell on the upper deck and one of the guns of the Dauntless burst and killed and wounded several men at the gun. During the morning the English made an attempt to storm the Malakoff and through some misunderstanding 50 bluejackets and hundreds of soldiers lost their lives.

Tu.19th.June. Daylight. Fleet under way. Cruised off Sebastopol. Sunset. Fleet came to anchor.

W.20th.June. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. Nothing of note during the day. At night some of the line-of-battle ships went in and fired a fine broadside of shell. This sort of fire annoys the enemy very much.

Thurs.21st June. Daylight. Weather fine. Commander Martin joined this ship and read his Commission. During the day a fire observed in Sebastopol and heavy firing of musketry.

F.22nd. June. Weather fine. Nothing particular occurred. At noon our gig went in with a flag of truce to deliver letters from our (Russian.Ed.) prisoners.

Sat.23rd.June. Weather fine. Nothing particular occurred.

Sun 24th.June. Daylight. Weather fine. One man died on board. Sir George Brown came on board, sick. At noon, flag of truce sent in to Sebastopol.

M.25th.June. Daylight. Fresh breezes. French marten battery firing at intervals. The shells were observed bursting over enemy shipping. Poor Captain Lyons reported dead from his wound in the leg. Six small gunboats arrived from England and a Captain Marshall dealt with a doctor for cruelty to the sick and wounded.

Tues.26th.June. Daylight. Strong gales from the s.s.west. Got underway and….. aft and on all day and night.

W.27th.June. Weather more moderate with showers of rain during the day. About 70 sail arrived from Constantinople.

Th.28th June. Daylight. Fresh breezes with heavy showers of rain. Intelligence received of the death of Lord Raglan. Who died at 9 p.m. this day. Fleet at anchor.

F.29th June. Daylight. Light breezes and fine. The Admiral went to visit the remains of Lord Raglan. Sir George Brown left for England.

Sat 30th.June. Daylight. Weather fine. Nothing of importance occurred this day.

Sun.1st.July. Daylight. Weather fine. Continual firing of shell and shot on shore. Court Martial on a marine for stabbing a Corporal. Sentenced to death.

Mon.2nd.July. Daylight. Fine weather. Watch got ready for coaling ship.

Tu.3rd.July. Daylight. Fresh breezes. Lord Raglan’s remains brought down to Kemmish Creek and conveyed on board the Caradoc. At 6.50 minute gun was fired as the remains were conveyed on board.

Wed.4th.July. Daylight. All small gunboats or ‘the pidgeons’ as the seamen call them, sailed for the Sea of Azoff.

Th.5th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. Coaled ship. Heavy firing on shore during the day. At night heavy firing of musketry.

F.6th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. Still coaling ship. At 1 p.m. ship is filled with coal.

Sat.7th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. Sharp firing on shore during the day.

Sun 8th.July. Weather fine. Firing on shore very sharp. General Jones arrived on board.

Mon.9th.July. Heavy firing during the first watch.

Tues.10th.July. Weather fine. Heavy firing again on shore through the day and all night. At 7 p.m. sent down the topgallant mast, unbent small sails and struck lower yards.

W.11th. July. Daylight. Weather fine. All hands refit ship and turn the lower rigging in a … and everything required.

Th.12th July. Daylight. Fresh breezes. Hands employed refitting ship. At 3 p.m. sent up topgallant mast and lower yards. Sharp firing at night.

F.13th.July. Daylight. Fresh breezes with thunder and lightening. Bent small sails and painted mastheads.

Sat.14th. July. Daylight. Strong breeze. Struck topgallant mast. Nothing of note during the day.

Sun.15th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. At noon heavy squalls with rain.

M.16th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. Exercises shifting topgallant mast and yards.

Tu 17th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. Exercising topgallant mast and yards, reefing, making sail.

W.18th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. General Quarters. At 5.30 p.m.exercising topgallant mast and yards.

Th.19th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. Sent up topgallant mast and yards and exercised furl and main. The Promethius with Admiral Freemantle on board arrived.

F.20th. July. Daylight. Weather fine. Nothing of note took place during the day. At evening exercised making of plain sail, reefing topsails and shifting courses.

Sat.21st.July. Weather fine. Loosed sails. Nothing of note took place during the day.

Sun 22nd. July. Weather fine. Crossed topgallant yards. Gave leave to first class petty officers.

M.23rd. July. Daylight. Weather fine. At 6.35 punishment on board. At 8 a.m. broke topgallant yard. During the morning the main deck quarters employed firing at a target. At 1.30 main topmen employed refitting topsail yard.

Sun.24th. July. Daylight. Weather fine. At 5.30 p.m. exercised making sail.

M. 25th. July. Daylight. Squally weather. Sent up topgallant mast and yards. At 5.30 p.m. exercised getting up and down launches’ purchases. Got in launch and pinnace.

Tues. 26th. July. Daylight. Weather squally with showers of rain. At 1.30 all hands made and mended clothes. At 5.30 exercised reefing topsails and furling with three reefs.

W.27th.July. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant yard. At 5.30 exercised sails. Sunset. Sent down topgallant mast and yards.

Th.28th.July. Daylight. Light breezes with rain. At 10 a.m. loosed sails. 2 p.m. furled sails.

F.29th.July. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant and royal yard. Gave leave to first class petty officers. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yard.

Sat.30thJuly.Daylight. Weather fine. Sent up topgallant and royal yards and loosed sails. 9.15 furled sails. At 5.30 got in launch and rove hammock gauntlines and clotheslines.

Sun.31st. July. Daylight. Light breezes with rain. Scrubbed hammocks and washed clothes. At 8 a.m. loosed sails. At 1.30 furled sails.

Wed..1st. Aug. Daylight. Weather squally with rain. Sent down topgallant mast. Got in pinnace. At 3.30 hands to their stations reefing topsails and courses.

Days don’t match dates here.

Thursday 2nd.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant mast and yard. Loosed sails. At 1.30 furled sails and aired bedding. At 5.30 exercised foretopsail. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yard.

Fri.3rd.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 3 a.m. scrubbed and washed clothes. At 8 a.m.sent up topgallant and royal yard. At sunset sent them down again.

Sat 4th. Aug. Daylight. At 3 a.m.up all hammocks and get under way. At 7 a.m. anchored within 3000 yards of Sebastopol. At 1 got our anchor up as we found we were within range of enemy shelling.

Sun 5th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 sent up topgallant and yard. At 11.30 Divine Service on board. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and yard. Loaded all guns with shot.

M.6th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent down main yard to replace boom irons which had carried away. At 5.30 p.m. sent up main yard. At 7 p.m. rove hammock gauntlines and clotheslines. Got in second launch.

Tu.7th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 3 a.m.scrubbed hammocks and washed clothes. At 6 p.m. exercised in making sail and shifting topsails. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yards.

8th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. Sent up topgallant and royal yards. Loosed sails. At 8.30 General Quarters. At 11.15 furled sails. At 1.15 General Quarters and fired at a target. At 4.15 heavy squalls and sent down topgallant mast and yard.. Got in first pinnace.

9th Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. Sent up topgallant mast and royal yards, loosed sails. At 9 a.m. Articles of War read to all the crew and Memos of Court Martials. At 11.30 aired bedding. At 1.50 furled sails. At 2.15 watch below make and mend clothes. At 2.45 watch out pinnace. Heavy firing on shore during the first watch.

10th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 3 a.m. scrubbed and washed clothes.
At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant and royal yard. At 2 p.m. in the advance, Russian battery blew up. At 5 p.m exercised in making and furling sail., shifting courses and furling sails. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yard.

11th.Aug. At 11.30 a.m. furled sails. At 3 p.m. French steamer went in and opened fire on the Russian advance and did good execution. Very heavy firing on shore during the night.

12th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant and royal yard. Nothing of any note during the day.

13th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant and royal yard. Loosed sails. On upper and main deck exercised with great guns. At noon French mortar steamer employed throwing shell into the Russian advance battery. Sunset. Down topgallant and royal yard.

14th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 3 a.m. scrubbed hammocks and washed clothes. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant and royal yard. Middle deck exercised great guns.

15th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. dressed ship with flags. The Emperor’s Birthday. The French had a regatta with all their boats at noon firing a royal salute. Sunset. Sent down the topgallant and royal yards. Undressed ship.

16th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant and royal yard and exercised yard. At 11.30 aired bedding, made and mended clothes. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yard. The firing on shore was very heavy during the night.

17th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 2 a.m. coal vessel came alongside for coaling ship. At noon received news of a great victory obtained over the enemy by the allies. Upwards of 5000 Russians killed and taken prisoner. A rumour of General Arthur (?) Sacen (?) being killed.

18th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. Very heavy firing on shore. Two French line-of-battle ships sailed with Russian prisoners.

19th Aug. Daylight. Weather changeable. At 8 a.m.sent up topgallant and royal yard. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yard.

20th.Aug. Daylight.Strong breezes. At 6.30 two men punished.

21st.Aug. Daylight.Weather fine. At 3 a.m.scrubbed hammocks, scrubbed clothes. At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant and royal yards, loosed sails. At 1.30 furled sails. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yards. Discovered the enemy making a bridge across the harbour. The firing on shore was very heavy.

22nd. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant and royal yards. Hoisted the national flag at the masthead. At noon fired a salute. Sunset. Sent down the topgallant and royal yards.

23rd.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up the topgallant and royal yards. At 11 a.m aired bedding and got 2nd. Launch out. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yards. All hands employed getting mortar boats into the French creek during the night.

24th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. Made preparations to man yards. Heavy firing on shore. French mortar boats trying their range and the enemy very busily employed on the north side, erecting nine batteries.

25th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant and royal yards. At 1.15 p.m. manned yards for Baron de Radcliffe, Ambassador of Turkey, who came on board the Royal Albert. Fired a salute of 19 guns. He left for Headquarters at 9 p.m.

26th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. crossed topgallant and royal yards. At 1 p.m. leave for ship’s company to go ship visiting. Sunset. Got down topgallant and royal yards. Got the pinnace on board.

27th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. crossed topgallant and royal yards. Loosed sails. Different officers went ashore to the Army Headquarters to meet Baron de Radcliffe who was going to confer honours on them. At 1.30 furled sails. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yard.

28th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant and royal yards. Divisions. Quarters marines employed firing at target. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yards.

29th. Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. sent up topgallant and royal yards. Loosed sails. At 9 a.m General Quarters. Fired at target. At 2 p.m. boys employed firing at a target. At 5.30 sent down topgallant and royal yards.

30th.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m.sent up topgallant and royal yards. At 11 aired bedding. At 5.30 made sail, shifted topsails. Shortened and furled sail and sent down royal yards.

31st.Aug. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8a.m.loosed sails. At 11.30 furled sails.

1st.Sept. An explosion took place on shore. Four French officers and forty men killed by the explosion. 80 men wounded. 7 tons of powder blew up by accident.

2nd. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant and royal yards. At 11.30 aired bedding. At 5.30 exercised making and furling sails. Sunset. Sent down topgallant and royal yards.

3rd. Sept. No entry.

4th.Sept. Daylight. Fine. In the morning watched the enemy making a sortie on the French trenches. The enemy retreated with great loss. At 3 a.m. scrubbed hammocks and washed clothes. At 5.30 exercised shifting jibs.

5th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m crossed topgallant and royal yards. Loosed sails. At 9 General Quarters. At 5.30 made plain sail and shifted topsails. Furled sails and sent down royal yard.

6th.Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up royal yard and rove purchases for slinging guns. Slung two middle deck guns on the forecastle to try what we could do to throw shell and shot into the Russian fort. At noon commenced firing. The siege on shore opened and did great execution but the firing of shell from our sling guns burst before reaching the distance that would have taken them into the fort. We could not tell where our shot fell. A fire in Sebastopol during the night.

7th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. Siege on shore kept up with great vigour. Some of our mortars on shore are directed towards the enemy shipping. At 3 p.m. enemy ship in the harbour seen to be on fire. Our fleet sent down topgallant yards and Admiral went ashore to Headquarters. The Terrible arrived with several mortars for the siege, also shot and shell from Gibraltar.
She was sent inshore to discharge the mortars. The siege went on with great vigour. The enemy ship is still on fire which caused some of their shipping to haul out of the way.

8th. Sept. Daylight. Strong breeze with heavy sea. Made preparations to weigh anchor and prepared for action just before noon. But the heavy swell prevented us from taking part with the Army. The mortar boats continued their fire with great effect for all that there was a great swell running where they were lying. During the morning a fire broke out in the dockyard. At noon the allies began their advance on the enemy to storm Sebastopol. At 12.10 the French flag flying on the Malakoff and our troops stormed the Redan. Part of the French army attacked the horseshoe battery but the poor fellows at the horseshoe battery had to retreat as the Russians sprang a mine.
As soon as the mine was fired the French faced the enemy again but were beaten back with great loss. The ground was covered with the dead and I am sorry to say that the English were repulsed at the Redan. The Russian steamers were directing their fire at the Malakoff. The town was on fire in several places and some heavy explosions took place in Sebastopol. The French still kept the Malakoff with hard work. The enemy attacked with great vigour but were beaten back with heavy losses, covering the road with their dead. Towards midnight, the enemy began their retreat.

9th. Aug. Daylight. Light breezes Hazy over the harbour I suppose from the guns and the houses on fire. At 5 a.m we can’t make out the enemy ships. They had disappeared for they were sunk. The enemy were in full retreat across the bridge and the steam boats were all that remained of their fleet. At 7 a.m the Constantine fort blew up/ At 10.30 the horseshoe blew up with a tremendous crash. During the day several other explosions took place but I fear lots of the French were blown up with them. I saw lots of them round the fort for the sake of plunder but the losses must be very great on both sides. The enemy losses must be enormous. The allies are in full possession of Sebastopol on the south side and on the north side the enemy is in great confusion.

10th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 sent up topgallant mast. Very little firing on shore during the day. Sunset. Sent down topgallant mast and yard. Got in all boats. Main purchase carried away but no damage done.

11th. Sept. Daylight. Blowing strong. Let go the port lower anchor and sent down all main sails out of the tops. Towards midnight the Russian steamer was set alight by their own hand.

12th. Sept. Daylight. Strong breezes. At 4 a.m. turned hands up to pick up port anchor. Got up steam, weighed anchor and shifted further off land.

13th. Sept. Daylight. Weather moderating. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant and yards. Loosed sail and got up all boats. At 11 furled sails and aired bedding. At 1.30 lashed up hammocks. Sunset. Got in one launch and one pinnace. Down royal yard.

14th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. Washed clothes. Fleet pick up their stations. Left 4 officers ashore to see the remains of the town of Sebastopol. At 6.30 got in two launches. Some firing took place during the day.

15th.Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. loosed and furled sails. At 11… At 4 p.m. invalids left for the hospital.

16th Sept. Daylight. Squally weather. At 11 a.m. sent down topgallant and yard.

17th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m sent up topgallant mast and yard. Loosed sail. At 8.45 got out the first launch. At 11 a.m furled sails. At 5.30 got in the launch.

18th.Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 3 a.m scrubbed hammocks and washed clothes. Manned yard and saluted.

19th. Sept. Daylight. Fresh breezes. At 4 p.m. sent down topgallant mast and yard. Got in pinnace.

20th.Sept. Daylight. Weather fine with fresh breezes. Leave given to petty officers for 48 hours.

21st. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 3 a.m. scrubbed and washed clothes. At 8.30 secured guns for sea. At 9 sent up topgallant mast and shortened. In cable at 11.30 and weighed anchor. Steamed for Balaclava in company with the chief part of the English fleet. Sunset. English fleet at Balaclava.

22nd. Sept.All fleet directed their course along the land towards Eupatoria. Before day, the fleet returned to Balaclava. Daylight. Weather fine. At 9 a.m. passed the London and the Queen and a French ship with marines and bluejackets dressed in marine jackets and … to get about (?) the boats and hammock nettings the same as troops are when they are on board so as to make the enemy believe we had troops on board. This was done to make the enemy come out of their dens. As we passed those ships we were loudly cheered. The cheers were returned by us and others. The Russians did not know what to make of it. We were followed by the enemy cavalry as we were going down their shore, close in, as if we were going to land. At 1.30 came to a French mortar which was throwing shell into a body of enemy troops. At 2.30 anchored at Eupatoria (now Yevpatoriya. Ed.). Admiral went ashore. French making to land troops. At 3.30 loosed all sail. T 5 Admiral returned to the ship.

23rd. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. Signal made for fleet to weigh. At 11.30 fleet weighed anchor and proceeded to sail along the land o Kimmish creek. Observed lots f Russian troops along the coast. At 6 p.m. anchored off Kimmish creek.

24th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 6.30 a.m. got out one pinnace and one launch. At 9 crossed yards and loosed sails. At 5.15 shifted topgallant mast. Sunset. Down royal yard.

25th.Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 3 a.m. washed clothes. At 9 crossed royal yard and mad preparation for getting sheet anchor in place. At 1.30 unrove purchase. Sunset. Down royal yard.

26th.Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. Heard shots fired by the enemy into the town. Shell killed three horses and one man.

27th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. Up royal yard. Nothing particular during the day.

28th.Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 9 a.m. got out launch for getting provisions.

29th Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 9 a.m. loosed sails. At 11.30 furled sails and gave leave to 80 men.

30th. Sept. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. crossed royal yard. At 9.30 Divine Service. In the afternoon leave given to ship’s company for ship visits or to go ashore.

1st. Oct. Daylight. Weather fine. At 8 a.m. crossed royal yard and loosed sails. At 11.30 furled sails. Sunset. Sent down royal yard.

2nd. Oct. Daylight. Hands scrubbed hammocks and washed clothes. Made preparations for embarking troops.

3rd. Oct. Daylight. Weather fine. Working party employed on board the Danube steamer and in the dockyard. In the afternoon got in two flat-bottomed boats.

4th. Oct. Daylight. Weather fine. Got ready for receiving troops. At 11.30 steamer got alongside with 17th. Regiment which we received aboard in the afternoon. Got in all boats.

5th.Oct. Daylight. Weather fine. The Telegraph arrived with dispatches. Got out 2nd. Pinnace. At 5.30 got in 2nd. Pinnace.

6th.Oct. Daylight. Weather fine. At 4 a.m. scrubbed and washed clothes. At 7.30

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